Limber Lungs: One Type of Airway Cell Can Regenerate Another Lung Cell Type

PHILADELPHIA – A new collaborative study describes a way that lung tissue can regenerate after injury. The team found that lung tissue has more dexterity in repairing tissue than once thought. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University, including co-senior authors Jon Epstein, MD, chair of the department of Cell and Developmental Biology, and Brigid L.M Hogan, Duke Medicine, along with co-first authors Rajan Jain, MD, a cardiologist and instructor in the Department of Medicine and Christina E. Barkauskas, also from Duke, report their findings in Nature Communications.

Read the full story here.

Penn Study Describes First Steps in Basic Biological Process that Could be Harnessed to Make Therapeutic Cells

PHILADELPHIA – Understanding the molecular signals that guide early cells in the embryo to develop into different types of organs provides insight into how tissues regenerate and repair themselves. By knowing the principles that underlie the intricate steps in this transformation, researchers will be able to make new cells at will for transplantation and tissue repair in such situations as liver or heart disease.

Now, investigators at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are able to explain how cell identity changes occur at the very beginning of the process. “During my scientific life, I’ve been fascinated by how early cells make ‘decisions’ to turn on one genetic program and exclude others,” says Kenneth S. Zaret, PhD, director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine and a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology. Zaret and postdoctoral fellow Abdenour Soufi, PhD, led a team that describes this research, which appeared online this week ahead of print in Cell. Soufi is now at the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh.

Read the full story here.